uses of Ruby’s Object#tap

Ruby 1.9′s Object#tap method has always seemed useful to me, but until now I hadn’t met the chance to use it. Every other time it seemed like abusing it in some way.

Now I came to an old code. Consider this:

cgi.text_field( "name" => "myfield",
                "value" => value,
                "size" => 20,
                "maxlength" => maxlength
              )

I needed to turn that maxlength into a conditional attribute (omiting it if it’s nil).
One way would have been extracting the attributes into a separate variable:

attrs = {
          "name" => "myfield",
          "value" => value,
          "size" => 20
        }
attrs['maxlength'] = maxlength if maxlength
cgi.text_field( attrs )

But this separates visually the cgi.text_field() call from it’s arguments, which I don’t like. Tap to the resque:

cgi.text_field({  "name" => "myfield",
                  "value" => value,
                  "size" => 20
                }.tap{|attrs| 
                  attrs['maxlength'] = maxlength if maxlength
                })

Now, isn’t that nice! (OK, maybe it isn’t, but at least it is encompassed in the method call and makes it easy to spot all attributes).

Be Sociable, Share!

Leave a Comment

To create code blocks or other preformatted text, indent by four spaces:

    This will be displayed in a monospaced font. The first four 
    spaces will be stripped off, but all other whitespace
    will be preserved.
    
    Markdown is turned off in code blocks:
     [This is not a link](http://example.com)

To create not a block, but an inline code span, use backticks:

Here is some inline `code`.

For more help see http://daringfireball.net/projects/markdown/syntax


NOTE - You can use these HTML tags and attributes:
<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Current ye@r *